Happy Ideas

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I made a promise to myself, never to stop tangenting. It’s a pretty easy promise to keep rather than, “I will stop eating sugar”. As on my way home I thought of three more tangents to tangent about. But I really need to stay focused and tangent about a new journey that began today.

I started an Honours degree to formally research beach happiness – under the supervision of Dr Kerrie Foxwell-Norton at the School of Humanities, Griffith University (a woman I dream to be a fraction of one day).

As I am sure there will be plenty of time to tangent about Kerrie, what I do have to share is a massive revelation and something that stunned my vision of where I could be one day.

That being (as of this afternoon) I realised that I am a mere victim of my own insanity (in context of craziness).

While deep in thought this afternoon during one of the courses I have to do, I realised that I am obsessed with measuring my output to drive my efficiency – life, love, tangents, friends, blitzed beaches, best car parking spaces and the number of times my Bug started on the first pop. I’m obsessed so much that I actually want to measure my own passion, and that being, healthy beaches and happy communities.

Is this a good thing? Or am I just conforming to how society is ‘driven’ (in the context of steered).

Think about it, how are you measured and how do you measure yourself? What does this mean to you? How many chat-ups did you ‘endure’ while out the other night? How many papers have you published? How many people attended your event? Or even how many friends ‘like’ your post?

My multidisciplinary nature half agrees while my conspiracy nature 100% agrees. Another part of me thinks it’s all bullshit and I should probably shut up shop, actually chill on a beach and let my own productivity exist for what it is – not what it was or could, should, would be.

This has led me to re-think (massively) about my beach happiness research. Surprise-surprise – or no surprise at all. So for the meantime I’ve decided that I will just let myself run wild, try not to conform to society and let my ideas continue to be happy – for what they stand to be at a point of time.

At this point of time, they are fast, happy and excited.

The sand you may find through your car after you visit the beach could have seen life on Earth evolve

"Detail of a 4.4 billion-year-old zircon crystal from the Jack Hills region of Australia. The crystal, now confirmed to be the oldest bit of the Earth's crust is providing new insight into how the early Earth cooled from a ball of magma and formed continents just 160 million years after the formation of our solar system" - source: Canberra Times

“Detail of a 4.4 billion-year-old zircon crystal from the Jack Hills region of Australia. The crystal, now confirmed to be the oldest bit of the Earth’s crust is providing new insight into how the early Earth cooled from a ball of magma and formed continents just 160 million years after the formation of our solar system” – source: Canberra Times

Somehow sand is always on my mind. Whether it be because I always have sand in my shoes, or that piles of sand seem to mark my presence (I am serious, my boyfriend questioned the pile of sand next the bed today!), it’s all for a good reason.

’cause did you know?

Every time you walk along the beach millions of grains of sand move beneath your feet. At a glance it’s just sand, but when viewed through a microscope, you can see that the grains are actually colourful fragments of gem, coral, minerals and shells.

That’s because sand is the remnants of weathered rock and shelled creatures, broken down by waves and wind over hundreds of millions of years.

Each individual grain has its own, amazing geographic and biological history. For instance, scientists have discovered that a grain of sand found in the Jack Hills in Western Australia is actually a tiny crystal of zircon and is 4.4 billion years old (go to page 30 of the link). To put that in perspective, it’s thought that the Earth itself is about 4.5 billion years old.

So who knows — the sand you may find through your car after you visit the beach could have seen life on Earth evolve.

That woman is Lyn Wright

Leadership for sustainability has saved The Spit from being developed.

Leadership for sustainability has saved The Spit from being developed.

I have a funny way of turning my thoughts into words that make sense. Most of the time it’s pretty simple and quick, but I am struggling with a current task. I need to fill in the blanks for a United Nations course I am keen to do. I need to come up with 250-500 words about why I think leadership is important for sustainability.

So, I thought that it would be appropriate to reflect on my experience as a student and leader for sustainability.

Every facet of my life is shaped around striving towards a lifestyle that is in balance with the planet. Every choice I make takes into account past, present and future environmental and social impacts, and every action aims to improve the resilience of the land and sea, and the vibrancy of communities.

I believe where there is sustainability there is balance, justice and leadership. The later is a keystone element for sustainability, and comes in many different forms, from everyday leadership to world changing leadership – which you can’t have one without the other. Foremost, change catalysts to act on and be leaders for sustainability. In my community, I am one of those everyday catalysts who galvanise landscape change; though, I couldn’t be a leader without first being inspired by another leader.

This brings me to share a story about a woman with dignity, composure and passion and most of all has shaped my view on leadership for sustainability. She believes to be proactive about sustainability you need passion, the right people and a plan. You can’t have one without the other, and you can’t have less or more of each need. Similar to the way the planet needs balance; leadership for sustainability is also about finding the right balance. She has inspired me, and others to show dignity, composure and act on passion, as well as ways to inspire others to act, while being truthful, trusting and a pleasure to be around.

From experience, I believe the above comes with showing respect. Therefore, respect is the keystone quality of leadership for sustainability.